Backups – the apparently forgotten craft

At the dawn of my career, I worked in two different old-school computer mainframe operations organizations. We spent a considerable amount of time (I’m estimating 20%) doing backups. Sure, computers were a lot slower then, and we had a lot less data.

We did backups for a reason: things happen. All kinds of things, like hardware failures, software bugs, accidents, mistakes, small and large disasters, and more. I can recall numerous times when we had to recover individual files, complete databases, and ground-up (“bare metal”) recoveries to get things going again.

We didn’t wait for these scenarios to occur to see whether we could do any of these types of restores. We practiced, regularly. In one mainframe shop early in my career, we completely restored our OS every Sunday night. Okay, this was in part a storage defragmentation measure and performed mainly for this purpose. However, we were still doing a bare metal restoration, precisely like what we would do if our data center burned down and we had to recover our data and applications on a different system.

Was this exciting work? Certainly not.

Interesting? Not in the least.

Essential? Absolutely.

So what am I getting at here? Am I merely reminiscing about the good old days? Hardly.

I’m talking about ransomware. At times, it’s difficult for me to sympathize with the organizations that are victims of ransomware. It’s hard for me to rationalize why an organization would even remotely consider paying a ransom (particularly when the FBI reported that only about half of organizations would be able to decrypt their data when they paid the ransom) (sorry, I cannot find the link to that advisory, I’ll keep looking and update this article when I find it).

A survey by Kaspersky indicated some facts that shocked me:

  • 37 percent of respondents were unable to accurately define ransomware let alone understand the damage it can deliver.
  • Of those survey respondents who suffered a ransomware attack, 40 percent said they would not know the immediate steps to take in response.

I’m amazed by these results. Do IT organizations no longer understand IT operations fundamentals that have been around for decades? I hate to sound harsh, but if this is the case, organizations deserve the consequences they experience when ransomware (or human error, or software bugs, etc.) strikes.

That said…. I am acutely aware that it can be difficult to find good IT help these days. However, if an organization is crippled by ransomware, they’ve already gone “all-in” with information technology, but neglected to implement common safeguards like data backup.

(image courtesy recordnations.com)

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