Why wait for a security breach to improve security?

Neiman Marcus is the victim of a security breach. Neiman Marcus provided a statement to journalist Brian Krebs:

Neiman Marcus was informed by our credit card processor in mid-December of potentially unauthorised payment card activity that occurred following customer purchases at our Neiman Marcus Group stores.

We informed federal law enforcement agencies and are working actively with the U.S. Secret Service, the payment brands, our credit card processor, a leading investigations, intelligence and risk management firm, and a leading forensic firm to investigate the situation. On January 1st, the forensics firm discovered evidence that the company was the victim of a criminal cyber-security intrusion and that some customers’ cards were possibly compromised as a result.

We have begun to contain the intrusion and have taken significant steps to further enhance information security.

The security of our customers’ information is always a priority and we sincerely regret any inconvenience. We are taking steps, where possible, to notify customers whose cards we know were used fraudulently after making a purchase at our store.

I want to focus on one of Neiman Marcus’ statements:

We have … taken significant steps to further enhance information security.

Why do companies wait for a disaster to occur before making improvements that could have prevented the incident – saving the organization and its customers untold hours of lost productivity? Had Neiman Marcus taken these steps earlier,  the breach might not have occurred.  Or so we think.

Why do organizations wait until a security incident occurs before taking more aggressive steps to protect information?

  1. They don’t think it will happen to them. Often, an organization eyes a peer that suffered a breach and thinks, their security and operations are sloppy and they had it coming. But alas, those in an organization who think their security and operations are not sloppy are probably not familiar with their security and operations. In most organizations, security and systems are just barely good enough to get by. That’s human nature.
  2. Security costs too much. To them I say, “If you think prevention is expensive, have you priced incident response lately?”
  3. We’ll fix things later. Sure – only if someone is holding it over your head (like a payment processor pushing a merchant or service provider towards PCI compliance). That particular form of “later” never comes. Kicking the can down the road doesn’t solve the problem.

It is human nature to believe that another’s misfortunes can’t happen to us. Until it does.

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